Reporting Child Abuse

Reporting Child Abuse

Reporting Child Abuse

Unfortunately, many children are subject to child abuse and in many cases, the abuse is not detected. Due to a variety of reasons, the children may possibly not speak up to another adult about what they endure at home. Besides parents, those who see these children in a familiar capacity are teachers, educators, and other community members and these individuals are encouraged to report cases of child abuse if they suspect it.

 

What is Child Abuse

The abuse is sometimes not spotted because the abuse does not have to be physical and it may not leave bruises. Children can face physical abuse, which includes broken bones, bruises, and scratches. They can also be subjected to neglect or harmful conditions that result in unsafe conditions for the child at home. The abuse can also involve sexual assault and cruel punishments or injuries. When children are being abused like this, they usually experience it privately at home, which means witnesses don’t actually see the abuse happen. However, a person can report cases as long as they have a suspicion that the child is a victim to abuse.

 

Reporting Abuse

There are many different warning signs for abuse and it’s important to know them if a person works with or is in a community with children. Signs can range from feeling anxious to suspicious injuries to interest in sexual activity. While all individuals are not required to report abuse, they are encouraged to do so. However, there are some people who are considered to be mandated reporters and they are legally required to report all cases of abuse or neglect. These individuals include teachers, school employees, and coaches. The mandated reporter is legally obligated to report the case to a police or sheriff’s office and/or child protective services. Reporting cases of child abuse will protect children and save lives.

 

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