Hit and Run

Hit and Run

Hit and Run

Due to the way that laws are written, crimes involving vehicles vary depending on a variety of factors. The severity of the crime hinges on events including casualties or injury, damage to property, whether the driver was under the influence of drugs or alcohol, or even the type of vehicles involved.

In California legislature, under Vehicle Code 20002, a situation is defined as a “hit and run” when the perpetrator causes harm or damage while driving and then leaves the scene without providing their information or claiming responsibility. The seriousness of the crime increases if a person is injured or killed. The severity of the crime is also escalated when the perpetrator does not stay at the scene of the crime. It is essential to the processing of the incident that the perpetrator remains onsite to provide a statement and identification.

Leaving the scene of an accident that you are involved in is dangerous for everyone. It can have very serious consequences, including delaying medical attention to anyone injured at the scene. It is also important to note that you do not necessarily need to be the party at fault to be charged with a hit and run. Anyone involved who leaves the scene prematurely can be charged under VC 20002. When found guilty of a hit and run in a court of law, the severity of the punishment depends on such circumstances, including the actions taken after the event. Adversely, if one is falsely accused of a hit in run, as with any other crime, a defendant could prove that were not involved and do not deserve punishment under the law.

 

Share your legal questions with Law Advocate Group, LLP

Skip to content