Committing a Hit and Run

Committing a Hit and Run

Committing a Hit and Run

 

Crimes involving vehicles are numerous, and change based on the casualties involved, and how it occurred. For example, crimes can change based on bodily injury, driving under the influence, and the type of vehicles involved. One specific crime that will be examined in this article, is that of a hit and run.

 

Under California Vehicle Code 20002, a hit and run occurs when the perpetrator damages property in the accident, does not offer their name/insurance/number, and then abandons the site where the damage occurred. A hit and run can involve either damage to property like a vehicle, or bodily damage to a person (which then would increase punishment). Instead of leaving the scene, someone that is involved in an accident should stay on-site and provide all of their relevant identifying information to those also involved.

 

Failing to follow the law when an accident occurs, can be very costly for every single person involved. You do not have to be the one at fault in order to be charged with a hit and run. Even if another car caused the accident and injury, if another involved party leaves the scene prematurely they can be charged under VC 20002. A perpetrator that has been found guilty can face punishments that increase in severity based on context, but there are general penalties like up to six months in a county jail in California. If falsely accused of a hit and run, a defendant could possibly prove that they were not the party involved in the accident.

 

 

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